Food Safety

Virulence Determination for Rapid Extraintestinal Dissemination (Acute Infection) of Common Salmonella Serotypes in Swine

Authors
  • A. T. Loynachan (Iowa State University)
  • J. M. Nugent (Iowa State University)
  • Matthew M. Erdman (Iowa State University)
  • D.L. Hank Harris (Iowa State University)

Abstract

Salmonella enterica (Typhimurium and Choleraesuis) have been shown to rapidly disseminate extraintestinally (RED) within 3 hours of intranasal inoculation in pigs (1,2,5,6). Evaluation of RED serotypes may be an important indicator of Salmonella virulence. Experimentally, pigs were challenged with important lymph node, fecal, and vaccine isolates of Salmonella and evaluated for RED. These isolates include S. Heidelberg, S. Infantis, S. Derby, S. Worthington, S. 4, 12 imonophasic, S. untypable HL 10416, S. Typhimurium, S. Typhimurium variant Copenhagen, S. Bredeney, S. Muenchen, S. Brandenburg, S. Choleraesuis SC-38, S. Choleraesuis SC-54, and S. Choleraesuis strain Argus. Three hours after intranasal inoculation, the pigs were euthanized, necropsied, and the following tissues were collected for qualitative isolation: tonsil, thymus, blood, mandibular lymph node, lung, spleen, liver, ileocecal lymph node, colon contents, and cecum contents. Fewer tissues were positive for vaccine strains compared with wild type or parent strains.

Keywords: ASL R1807, pathogenesis, intranasal, red

How to Cite:

Loynachan, A. T., Nugent, J. M., Erdman, M. M. & Harris, D. H., (2003) “Virulence Determination for Rapid Extraintestinal Dissemination (Acute Infection) of Common Salmonella Serotypes in Swine”, Iowa State University Animal Industry Report 1(1).

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Published on
01 Jan 2003
Peer Reviewed