Breeding Physiology

Quantitative Measurement of PIT1, GH, and PRL mRNA and Circulating Hormone Levels in Pig Families Segregating PIT1 Genotypes

Authors
  • H. S. Sun (Iowa State University)
  • Lloyd L. Anderson (Iowa State University)
  • C. K. Tuggle (Iowa State University)
  • J. Klindt (United States Department of Agriculture)

Abstract

PIT1 is a member of the POU-domain family gene and is a positive regulator for growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and thyrotroph-stimulating hormone β(TSHB) in several mammalian species. Previous studies in pigs have shown an association of PIT1 polymorphisms with growth and carcass traits in which the primarily Chinese alleles were associated with heavier birth weight and greater backfat. To further investigate the role of PIT1 in controlling pig growth traits, Chinese Meishan (MS) pigs segregating PIT1 polymorphisms were used to study the differences of GH and PRL at both mRNA and circulating hormone levels. A total of 60 animals from nine litters was used to collect both pituitary and blood samples at day 1, 15, and 30 after birth. A novel procedure that involves standard curve quantification was used to quantify mRNA amount for GH, PRL, PIT1-α, and PIT1-β. Conventional hormone assays were done to measure the circulating amount of GH and PRL from the blood. Statistical analyses of PIT1 genotypes, sex, and days on either mRNA (PIT1 alternative transcripts, GH, and PRL) or circulating hormone (GH and PRL) were done by using the leastsquares procedure. This study investigates GH and PRL at both mRNA and circulating hormone levels in MS pigs segregating PIT1 polymorphisms. Results from this study will provide useful information on the role of PIT1 in controlling pig growth traits.

Keywords: ASL R1575

How to Cite:

Sun, H. S., Anderson, L. L., Tuggle, C. K. & Klindt, J., (1999) “Quantitative Measurement of PIT1, GH, and PRL mRNA and Circulating Hormone Levels in Pig Families Segregating PIT1 Genotypes”, Iowa State University Animal Industry Report 1(1).

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Published on
01 Jan 1999
Peer Reviewed