Feedlot Nutrition and Growth and Management

Integration of Pasturing Systems for Cattle Finishing Programs: A Progress Report

Authors
  • Hayati Koknaroglu (Iowa State University)
  • M. P. Hoffman (Iowa State University)

Abstract

This progress report presents the findings of the first two years of a multi-year study. Each year 84 fall-born and 28 spring-born calves of similar genetic background were used to evaluate the incorporation of rotational pasturing systems into cattle finishing programs. The fall-born calves were started on test on May 7, 1996, and May 8, 1997, whereas the spring-born calves were started on test on October 1, 1996, and September 13, 1997. A total of seven treatments were imposed: 1) fall-born calves directly into the feedlot; 2) fall-born calves put on pasture and receiving an ionophore and moved to the feedlot on July 30, 1996, and July 29, 1997 in the first and second years, respectively; 3) fall-born calves put on pasture without an ionophore and moved to the feedlot on July 30, 1996 and July 29, 1997, in the first and second years, respectively; 4) fall-born calves put on pasture and receiving an ionophore and moved to the feedlot on October 22, 1996, and October 21, 1997, in the first and second years, respectively; 5) fall-born calves put on pasture without an ionophore and moved to the feedlot on October 22, 1996, and October 21, 1997, in the first and second years, respectively; 6) spring-born calves put on pasture and receiving an ionophore and moved to the feedlot on October 22, 1996, and October 21, 1997, in the first and second years, respectively; and 7) spring-born calves put on pasture without an ionophore and moved to the feedlot on October 22, 1996, and October 21, 1997, in the first and second years, respectively. Cattle receiving an ionophore on pasture gained more rapidly; however, cattle without access to an ionophore gained more rapidly in drylot thus negating the advantage obtained on pasture. Overall daily gains and feed conversions in drylot only, improved with increasing numbers of days fed in drylot; however, this may not be very cost effective. At similar end weights no real differences were observed in yield grades among the treatments; however, for fall-born calves the percentage grading Prime and Choice was higher for cattle fed longer in drylot.

Keywords: ASL R1633

How to Cite:

Koknaroglu, H. & Hoffman, M. P., (2000) “Integration of Pasturing Systems for Cattle Finishing Programs: A Progress Report”, Iowa State University Animal Industry Report 1(1).

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Published on
01 Jan 2000
Peer Reviewed