Swine

Piglet Mortality in an Outdoor Farrowing Hut: What Contributes to their Demise Over the First 72-h After Parturition?

Authors
  • Jill Garvey (Iowa State University)
  • Anna K. Johnson (Iowa State University)
  • Larry J. Sadler (Iowa State University)
  • Kenneth J. Stalder (Iowa State University)
  • John McGlone (Texas Tech University)

Abstract

Pre-weaning mortality has been estimated to cost the industry over $100 million/yr and is a serious animal wellbeing concern. The objective of this study were to determine behavior (nursing) and postures, (active and inactive) for piglets over the first 72-h after parturition when housed in an outdoor farrowing hut. No differences were found for nursing (P = 0.69), active (P = 0.52), inactive (P = 0.59) or unknown (P = 0.78) for piglets that were killed or not killed over the first 72-h after parturition. In conclusion there were no differences in the behavioral repertoire performed by outdoor loose housed piglets that resulted in their death by crushing over the first 72-h after parturition. Therefore, finding few behavioral differences between treatments may indicate that variation among sow behavior is a more significant cause of piglet rushing than variation among piglet behaviors.

Keywords: ASL R2463

How to Cite:

Garvey, J., Johnson, A. K., Sadler, L. J., Stalder, K. J. & McGlone, J., (2009) “Piglet Mortality in an Outdoor Farrowing Hut: What Contributes to their Demise Over the First 72-h After Parturition?”, Iowa State University Animal Industry Report 6(1). doi: https://doi.org/10.31274/ans_air-180814-715

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Published on
01 Jan 2009
Peer Reviewed