Articles

A Qualitative Case Study of Junior Faculty Mentoring Practices at Selected Minority Higher Educational Institutions

Authors
  • Lewis S. Waller (North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University)
  • Musibau A. Shofoluwe (North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University)

Abstract

A qualitative case study was conducted to investigate the perceptions of new junior tenure- track faculty members regarding mentoring practices at selected minority higher institutions (MHI). The main goal of the study was to assess the existence and nature of mentoring programs at MHI as perceived by the new tenure-track faculty. The primary objective was to identify and understand the nature of experiences that new tenure-track faculty face and the role of mentoring and other supports in their attainment of tenure and promotion. Study respondents were selected from two historically black universities located in the southeastern region of the United States. These respondents were presented with a structured interview protocol consisting of open-ended questionnaire designed to gather all necessary information for this study. Findings of the study show that the views of the respondents were mixed across the two institutions, although certain commonality of opinions was found. Based on these findings, it was recommended that formal mentoring programs be developed at minority higher institutions in order to assist and prepare new tenure-track faculty members for promotion and tenure.

Keywords: administration, higher edcation, professional development, research

How to Cite:

Waller, L. S. & Shofoluwe, M. A., (2013) “A Qualitative Case Study of Junior Faculty Mentoring Practices at Selected Minority Higher Educational Institutions”, The Journal of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering 29(3).

Downloads:
Download PDF
View PDF

35 Views

11 Downloads

Published on
07 Jan 2013
License