Article

Exploring Engineering Technology Students’ Competencies in an Introductory Computer-Aided Drafting and Design Course: A Follow-on Study

Author
  • Rustin Webster (Purdue University)

Abstract

This descriptive research paper explores the degree to which an introductory computer-aided drafting and design (CAD&D) course impacted engineering technology (ET) students’ self-reported competencies (i.e., a cluster of related knowledge, skills, and abilities). The student-centered course, which consisted of approximately 95% active learning, included a 16-week semi-open design challenge with a moderately-structured problem. Four competency areas, which are included in a recent US Department of Labor’s Engineering Competency Model (ECM), were analyzed. A classroom activities and outcomes survey measured the degree to which 42 students from four cohorts over two consecutive years believed they had made progress in design, problem-solving, communication, and group/teamwork as a result of taking the course. The end-of-semester survey indicated positive self- reported progress in all four competency areas. Furthermore, additional student feedback from course evaluations provided evidence of positive reactions to the instructor, course, and active learning activities. This paper provides additional details and data from the two years following the 2017 pilot study. It also cross-analyzes the team project against the Gold Standard Project-Based Learning (PBL) Model’s eight essential project design elements.

Keywords: Computer-aided drafting and design (CAD&D), competency, active learning, project-based learning (PBL)

How to Cite:

Webster, R., (2022) “Exploring Engineering Technology Students’ Competencies in an Introductory Computer-Aided Drafting and Design Course: A Follow-on Study”, The Journal of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering 38(1), p.1–16.

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Published on
01 Feb 2022
Peer Reviewed