Consumer Behavior

Consumers with Visual Impairments: Impacts of Self-Efficacy and Public Self-Consciousness on Their Clothing Selection Motivations

Authors
  • Hyo Jung (Julie) Jung Chang (Texas Tech University)
  • Jennifer Yurchisin (University of North Carolina at Greensboro)
  • Nancy N Hodges (University of North Carolina and Greensboro)

Abstract

According to the U.S. Census (2013), approximately 57 million people in the U.S. have at least one form of disability. Because of physical or mental limitations, disabled individuals may engage in behaviors that are unlike those of others in their society (Ittyerah & Kumar, 2009). One such behavior that may be affected by disabilities is dress behavior. For example, if an individual has a visual impairment, she/he may need someone to assist with clothing selection and need clothing with less complicated design. Because consumer behavior research has typically focused on the general population of consumers and assumed consumers’ normalcy (Miller, 1997), the population of those with special needs has been largely ignored by researchers.

Keywords: self-efficacy, public self-consciousness, clothing selection, Visual impairments

How to Cite:

Chang, H. J., Yurchisin, J. & Hodges, N. N., (2014) “Consumers with Visual Impairments: Impacts of Self-Efficacy and Public Self-Consciousness on Their Clothing Selection Motivations”, International Textile and Apparel Association Annual Conference Proceedings 71(1).

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Published on
01 Jan 2014
Peer Reviewed