Creative Design: Professional

Design for a Wasp-Loving Entomologist. Using Digital Printing and Creative Pattern Cutting to Create an Ensemble to Reflect One’s Research Interests

Authors
  • Ellen McKinney orcid logo (Iowa State University)
  • Fatma Baytar orcid logo (Cornell University)

Abstract

The purpose of this ensemble was to celebrate the beautiful home and industrious nature of Dolichovespula maculata, a type of wasp colloquially known as the baldfaced hornet. (Figure 1). The ensemble was designed for a university professor who studies this wasp to wear to an entomology conference. Entomology academics commonly enjoy wearing apparel and accessories made of materials from or referencing the insects they study to academic conferences (See social media hashtag #entofashion.). The digital printing and subtraction cutting techniques worked together to accomplish the goal of creating a special ensemble for an entomologist to better reflect her research interests in her social surroundings. She is pictured below with two of her favorite things—a wasp nest and her insect net. The volume and layers of completed garment reference the many layers of a Dolichovespula maculata wasp nest, while the developed prints reference the nest and wasp and establish a cohesive color story. The ensemble received much interest when it was worn at the entomology conference. This complex work extends the knowledge of developing digitally printed garments directly from half-scale patterns (McKinney, 2016a) to subtraction cutting. Although this particular ensemble was designed for one person, the customization approach taken can be used for a variety of individuals and interests.

How to Cite:

McKinney, E. & Baytar, F., (2018) “Design for a Wasp-Loving Entomologist. Using Digital Printing and Creative Pattern Cutting to Create an Ensemble to Reflect One’s Research Interests”, International Textile and Apparel Association Annual Conference Proceedings 75(1).

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Published on
01 Jan 2018
Peer Reviewed